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 What to do with Faulty Buggies - Solutions and Suggestions

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Birdman
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PostSubject: What to do with Faulty Buggies - Solutions and Suggestions   Fri Jul 12, 2013 12:30 am

I was inspired to start this thread after reading Red8's experience with a faulty buggy at one of the Malaysian courses. Something that many golfers have no doubt experienced. I've had my fair share of bad buggy experiences over the years, including smoke coming from the under the seat, getting stuck in soggy fairways and having mud splashed all over me when pushing it (always volunteer to be the driver, not the pusher). Having to push one buggy with another up a hill, worse, having to get out and push a buggy up a hill. That one can die! Stretcher 

The worst was when the buggy shot off a steep slope into the jungle and it was heading for a huge tree, and the driver had jumped out of the buggy leaving me to die. I haven't played golf with that driver since. lol! 

There's no manual that tells us how to solve such problems, so I thought why not share some of my own solutions which I've come up with through trial and error yet have worked. Not always, sure, in which case, it's always good to have the club's phone number to call back for help. If that doesn't work, then I'll listen out for the sound of a marshal's motorcycle, by which time I'm clutching at straws. ROFL

We're all excited to get out there and play especially after a long drive to the club, myself included, but perhaps it might be a good idea to give the buggy a once-over before starting the round and while on the short drive to the first hole. Easy to do, and if you feel the buggy is unsafe or too sluggish for 18 holes, not too much trouble to turn back and change for another.

I try to remember to do it especially on hilly courses where it can be dangerous to have a faulty buggy.

My first warning sign is the condition of the buggy when I first see it. Are the seats torn, tyres bare, straps not securing the golf bag properly?

If it's battery powered, I check that the battery indicator shows it's at least half full; from experience, that's safely enough for one round of 18 holes. Anything less than half-full can be iffy on hilly courses. At best, you'll be frustrated at the snail-like crawl up slopes; at worst, your buggy will give up the ghost when you're at the point furthest from the clubhouse.

Then on the the drive to the first hole, I wiggle the steering from side to side to see if it's loose and there's too much play (especially dangerous when turning sharp corners at speed, understeer can send you diving off a slope or into a hazard).

I also step on the brakes to see if they bite well and take note if the buggy comes to a quick stop. If it takes more than a few metres to come to a stop, I change the buggy.

Another warning sign is when I step on the accelerator, if the buggy responses sluggishly, it's a possible indication of the buggy not having enough power to last 18 holes or climb up a steep slope, and that it might die on me halfway through the round. If the buggy doesn't move when stepping on the pedal, check the forward/reverse button/lever. Sometimes the button mysteriously resets to the centre neutral position, just select forward again and you're good to go. Same for the lever, but if it still doesn't work, try flipping it back and forth and back to forward again. If nothing works, check that the buggy is on by turning the on/off key.

For diesel buggies, sometimes there is no immediate engine response when stepping on the accelerator. The common solution is to repeatedly step on it, which I've found is not a good idea. I'm no engineer, but I was told that all that does is flood the engine with fuel, which just guarantees that the buggy will not move. If that does happen, wait a few minutes to let the fuel drain out before trying again gently. Feather the pedal, that is, press the pedal gently down until you feel the engine catch, then slowly continue to accelerate until it starts moving again. Sometimes, the engine doesn't catch fully, feather again and when the engine starts, hold the pedal there for a second or two more to let the engine fully bite, when you feel movement, then continue to accelerate gently and move off.  

That's just some of my personal solutions to problem buggies. We're out there to enjoy our golf, why let a faulty buggy spoil our day?

Feel free to share any more tips that might help. Very Happy


Last edited by Birdman on Fri Jul 12, 2013 1:06 am; edited 2 times in total
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Rafj
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PostSubject: Re: What to do with Faulty Buggies - Solutions and Suggestions   Fri Jul 12, 2013 12:42 am

Birdman wrote:
I was inspired to start this thread after reading Red8's experience with a faulty buggy at one of the Malaysian courses. Something that many golfers have no doubt experienced. I've had my fair share bad buggy experiences over the years, including smoke coming from the under the seat, getting stuck in soggy fairways and having mud splashed all over me when pushing it (always volunteer to be the driver, not the pusher). Having to push one buggy with another up a hill, worse, having to get out and push a buggy up a hill. That one can die! Stretcher 

The worst was when the buggy shot off a steep slope into the jungle and it was heading for a huge tree, and the driver had jumped out of the buggy leaving me to die. I haven't played golf with that driver since. lol! 

There's no manual that tells us how to solve such problems, so I thought why not share some of my own solutions which I've come up with through trial and error yet have worked. Not always, sure, in which case, it's always good to have the club's phone number to call back for help. If that doesn't work, then I'll listen out for the sound of a marshal's motorcycle, by which time I'm clutching at straws. ROFL

We're all excited to get out there and play especially after a long drive to the club, myself included, but perhaps it might be a good idea to give the buggy a once-over before starting the round and while on the short drive to the first hole. Easy to do, and if you feel the buggy is unsafe or too sluggish for 18 holes, not too much trouble to turn back and change for another.

I try to remember to do it especially on hilly courses where it can be dangerous to have a faulty buggy.

My first warning sign is the condition of the buggy when I first see it. Are the seats torn, tyres bare, straps not securing the golf bag properly?

If it's battery powered, I check that the battery indicator shows it's at least half full; from experience, that's safely enough for one round of 18 holes. Anything less than half-full can be iffy on hilly courses. At best, you'll be frustrated at the snail-like crawl up slopes; at worst, your buggy will give up the ghost when you're at the point furthest from the clubhouse.

Then on the the drive to the first hole, I wiggle the steering from side to side to see if it's loose and there's too much play (especially dangerous when turning sharp corners at speed, understeer can send you diving off a slope or into a hazard).

I also step on the brakes to see if they bite well and take note if the buggy comes to a quick stop. If it takes more than a few metres to come to a stop, I change the buggy.

Another warning sign is when I step on the accelerator, if the buggy responses sluggishly, it's a possible indication of the buggy not having enough power to last 18 holes or climb up a steep slope, and that it might die on me halfway through the round.

For diesel buggies, sometimes there is no immediate engine response when stepping on the accelerator. The common solution is to repeatedly step on it, which I've found is not a good idea. I'm no engineer, but I was told that all that does is flood the engine with fuel, which just guarantees that the buggy will not move. If that does happen, wait a few minutes to let the fuel drain out before trying again gently. Feather the pedal, that is, press the pedal gently down until you feel the engine catch, then slowly continue to accelerate until it starts moving again. Sometimes, the engine doesn't catch fully, feather again and when the engine starts, hold the pedal there for a second or two more to let the engine fully bite, when you feel movement, then continue to accelerate gently and move off.  

That's just some of my personal solutions to problem buggies. We're out there to enjoy our golf, why let a faulty buggy spoil our day?

Feel free to share any more tips that might help. Very Happy

 Sound advice! 

Just to add, if you find the diesel powered ones a bit sluggish, you can lift up the seats to access the engine compartment and 'tighten' the accelerator line to give it a bit of a boost...:-P
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kamen
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PostSubject: Re: What to do with Faulty Buggies - Solutions and Suggestions   Fri Jul 12, 2013 9:49 am

+1 for Birdman's golf cart safety tips! I love you
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Tiramisu
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PostSubject: Re: What to do with Faulty Buggies - Solutions and Suggestions   Fri Jul 12, 2013 10:12 am

Thanks  for yr sharing, Birdman.
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sob
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PostSubject: Re: What to do with Faulty Buggies - Solutions and Suggestions   Fri Jul 12, 2013 10:29 am

Yes if the buggy does not move, always check the fwd/rev selector first before calling for help.

Few times we called for help, the technician came and found the lever/selector in neutral position.

Embarassed
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percular
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PostSubject: Re: What to do with Faulty Buggies - Solutions and Suggestions   Fri Jul 12, 2013 10:41 am

IMHO, dun get too excited and scoot off to the tee box. Do a short drive and if you feel the buggy isn't driving right go speak the the staff. 

Once we had a buggy with so much free play in the steering, we almost missed the corner. The buggy didn't turn when we kinda full locked it
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hkhamateur
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PostSubject: Re: What to do with Faulty Buggies - Solutions and Suggestions   Fri Jul 12, 2013 11:40 am

sob wrote:
Yes if the buggy does not move, always check the fwd/rev selector first before calling for help.

Few called for help, the technician came and found the lever/selector in neutral position.

Embarassed
 
Tats bcoz the golfer (buggy driver) did nt step onto the brake pedal fully to lock it. Hence the buggy ll automatically set to default mode which s the Neutral position.Wink 
Just note on yr next golf trip.Cool
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chip_munkie
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PostSubject: Re: What to do with Faulty Buggies - Solutions and Suggestions   Fri Jul 12, 2013 1:54 pm

+1

Thanks Bro Birdman for the valuable advice, I once also had a faulty brake buggy, had to crash into my front flightmate's buggy in order to stop. Best is to test the brakes, steering and battery life before leaving the clubhouse, the same for rental cars when in overseas or SG as well. Cheers cheers
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sob
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PostSubject: Re: What to do with Faulty Buggies - Solutions and Suggestions   Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:01 pm

hkhamateur wrote:
sob wrote:
Yes if the buggy does not move, always check the fwd/rev selector first before calling for help.

Few called for help, the technician came and found the lever/selector in neutral position.

Embarassed
 
Tats bcoz the golfer (buggy driver) did nt step onto the brake pedal fully to lock it. Hence the buggy ll automatically set to default mode which s the Neutral position.Wink 
Just note on yr next golf trip.Cool

 Okie Dokie, Thank you Bro!!
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CKT61
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PostSubject: Re: What to do with Faulty Buggies - Solutions and Suggestions   Sat Jul 13, 2013 2:36 pm

Always start slow for any vehicle you've never drive before, gotta feel the car first. I've seen golfers floor the pedal when they move to the first Tee. Quite dangerous really. 

For clubs to cut cost on maintenance on the aesthetic part is "excusable" if the club don't bring in revenue. But to ignore the maintenance of the brakes is a big NO NO..
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